Pantheism

God thus excludes the world; he is only its cause; in no sense is he effect, of himself or anything else. Pantheism (better, “pandeism,” for again it is not really the theos that is described) means that God is the integral totality of ordinary cause-effects, and that there, is no super-cause independent of ordinary causes and effects.

Charles Hartshorne, Man’s Vision of God and the Logic of Theism (1964), p. 347

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Wisdom

But these are foolish things to all the wise,
And I love wisdom more than she loves me;
My tendency is to philosophise
On most things, from a tyrant to a tree;
But still the spouseless virgin Knowledge flies,
What are we? and whence come we? what shall be
Our ultimate existence? What’s our present?
Are questions answerless, and yet incessant.

Lord Byron, Don Juan (1818-24), Canto VI, Stanza 63

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Wisdom

Knowledge is indivisible. When people grow wise in one direction, they are sure to make it easier for themselves to grow wise in other directions as well. On the other hand, when they split up knowledge, concentrate on their own field, and scorn and ignore other fields, they grow less wise — even in their own field.

Isaac Asimov, The Roving Mind (1983), Ch. 25

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